Tag Archives: Tar Sands

GJEP on KPFK Pacifica Los Angeles This Week: Climate Change, Forests, and the Keystone Pipeline

Global Justice Ecology Project partners with Margaret Prescod’s Sojourner Truth show on KPFK–Pacifica Los Angeles radio show for a weekly Earth Minute on Tuesdays and a weekly 12 minute Environment Segment every Thursday.

This week’s Earth Minute discusses the impacts of climate change on bark beetles, which are wiping out vast expanses of conifer forests in North America.  On this week’s Earth Segment, Kari Fulton, of Environmental Justice Climate Change discusses the recent announcement that the decision on the Keystone XL tar sands pipeline would be  “postponed.”

Text from this week’s Earth Minute:

At the upcoming UN climate conference in Durban South Africa later this month, protecting forests will once again being looked to as the solution to climate change.  Meanwhile a tiny beetle, assisted by warming temperatures, is devouring coniferous forests across North America.

Since the 1990s, bark beetles have killed 30 billion trees in North America. Climate change is expanding the range of the beetles and increasing their numbers, while human activities–such as wildfire prevention and logging the best and strongest trees–has further assisted the beetle epidemic.

But instead of stepping back to evaluate what’s causing this forest crisis, the timber industry is moving ahead with plans to turn these trees into wood chips to be shipped around the globe for so-called “renewable” electricity production.  While this will supposedly help replace fossil fuels and mitigate climate change, it will also result in bark beetles spreading into and destroying new conifer forests–which will, in turn, worsen climate change.

For the Earth Minute and the Sojourner Truth show, this is Anne Petermann from Global Justice Ecology Project.

To listen to the Earth Minute, Click here: earth-minute-11_15_11

To Listen to the Earth Segment with Kari Fulton of Environmental Justice Climate Change being interviewed about the recent Keystone XL Pipeline decision, click here and scroll to minute 48:45.

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Filed under Climate Change, Earth Minute, Energy, Indigenous Peoples, Natural Disasters, Posts from Anne Petermann, Tar Sands, UNFCCC

Earth Minute: White House Protest Against the Tar Sands: Honor Treaties–Stop the Keystone XL Pipeline

Global Justice Ecology Project partners with Margaret Prescod’s Sojourner Truth show on KPFK–Pacifica Los Angeles radio show for a weekly Earth Minute on Tuesdays and a weekly 12 minute Environment Segment every Thursday.

This week’s Earth Minute discusses the Indigenous Peoples’ protest against the Keystone XL tar sands pipeline project that occurred in Washington DC on Sunday, November 6th.  To listen to this week’s Earth Minute, click here.

Text from this week’s Earth Minute:

This past Sunday, thousands of people traveled to the White House to protest the massive pipeline that would carry tar sands oil from the devastated boreal forests of Alberta to the Gulf of Mexico. President Obama will decide if the pipeline project can proceed in early 2012.

While the US is obligated to honor the Treaties it made with the Lakota and other indigenous nations, there has been virtually no consultation regarding the environmental impact of this massive pipeline that would endanger their lands.

At the DC rally, Cree/Métis Tantoo Cardinal, stated, “I was raised in the Fort McMurray area, the heart of the current tar sands projects. We are all protectors of the land and water. If you were to see with your own eyes the incredible destruction of our ecosystem, you’d understand that blind greed is destroying our land, water, and way of life.”

If approved, US based Native Nations in solidarity with First Nations from Canada have sworn to stop the pipeline.

For the Earth Minute and the Sojourner Truth show, this is Anne Petermann from Global Justice Ecology Project.

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Filed under Actions / Protest, Biodiversity, Climate Change, Earth Minute, Energy, Indigenous Peoples, Posts from Anne Petermann, Tar Sands, Water

Challenge Oprah Winfrey’s Support for Tar Sands Thursday Sept 8

Note: This action alert comes from Clayton Thomas Muller.  Clayton is on GJEP’s Board and is the Tar Sands Campaigner for the Indigenous Environmental Network

Oprah Winfrey has had Ethical Oil ads running on her Network OWN promoting tar sands as the ethical choice to middle eastern oil.

Tune in to Facebook Live (http://on.fb.me/fblivehq) on Thursday, September 8 at 1:30 PM PT / 4:30 PM ET for a live discussion with Oprah Winfrey.

Lets get as many people logged in to deluge her on how inaccurate the argument is and why there is nothing Ethical about Tar Sands!

Fcebook groups for event:http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=251369618236031

background article from Desmog Blog: http://www.desmogblog.com/open-letter-oprah-winfrey-ethical-oil-ads

–Clayton-IEN Tar Sands Team

To listen to Clayton’s Interview about the tar sands on KPFK today, click here

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Filed under Actions / Protest, Climate Justice, Tar Sands

KPFK Interview: The Indigenous Day of Action Against the Tar Sands in DC

Clayton Thomas Muller leads a workshop on the tar sands at the US Social Forum in Detroit in June 2010. Photo: Langelle/GJEP

This week’s Earth Segment on KPFK Los Angeles features an interview with Clayton Thomas Muller, Tar Sands Campaign Organizer for the Indigenous Environmental Network and a member of Global Justice Ecology Project’s Board of Directors.

Clayton discusses the Indigenous Day of Action that took place in Washington, DC on September 2nd to stop the Tar Sands Keystone XL pipeline, as well as the impacts of the pipeline and the tar sands gigaproject on Indigenous communities.

To listen to this interview click here  and scroll to minute 6:12.

About Clayton: 

Clayton Thomas-Muller, of the Mathias Colomb Cree Nation also known as Pukatawagan in Northern Manitoba, Canada, is an activist for Indigenous rights and environmental justice.  With his roots in the inner city of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada,Clayton began his work as a community organizer, working with Aboriginal youth.  Over the years Clayton work has taken him to five continents across our Mother Earth.

Based out of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, Clayton is involved in many initiatives to support the building of an inclusive movement for Energy and Climate Justice. He serves on the board of the Global Justice Ecology Project and Canadian based Raven Trust.

Recognized by Utne Magazine as one of the top 30 under 30 activists in the United States and as a Climate Hero 2009 by Yes Magazine, Clayton is the tar sands campaign organizer for the Indigenous Environmental Network. He works across Canada, Alaska and the lower 48 states with grassroots indigenous communities to defend against the sprawling infrastructure that includes pipelines, refineries and extraction associated with the tar sands, the largest and most destructive industrial development in the history of mankind.

The Earth Segment is a collaborative effort between Global Justice Ecology Project and KPFK’s Sojourner Truth show with Margaret Prescod.

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Filed under Actions / Protest, Biodiversity, Climate Change, Climate Justice, Energy, Indigenous Peoples, Tar Sands

KPFK Earth Segment: The Tar Sands Indigenous Day of Action with Chief Erasmus

Global Justice Ecology Project teams up with Margaret Prescod’s Sojourner Truth show on KPFK Los Angeles for a weekly segment on an environmental topic.

This week’s show features an interview with Chief Bill Erasmus, the Regional Chief of the Northwest Territories. He is from the Dene Nation. Regional Chief Erasmus has been elected as a member of the AFN Executive Committee since 1987.  Chief Erasmus was instrumental in working with the National Congress of American Indians as the NWT Vice Chief of the Assembly of First Nations in their passage of the resolution opposing the Keystone XL Tar Sands Pipeline.  He will be taking part in the DC Indigenous day of action on Sept 2, 2011

To listen to the 12 minute interview, click here and scroll to minute 21:40.

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Filed under Actions / Protest, Biodiversity, Climate Change, Climate Justice, Energy, Indigenous Peoples, Pollution, Tar Sands, Water

Earth Minute 8/30/11: Climate Change, the Tar Sands and Hurricane Irene

Global Justice Ecology Project teams up with the Sojourner Truth show on KPFK Los Angeles every Tuesday for an Earth Minute written and recorded by GJEP Executive Director Anne Petermann.

To listen to this week’s Earth Minute, click here and scroll to minute 38:41

Earth Minute 8/30/11

As I sat home yesterday listening to the remnants of Hurricane Irene whipping the trees outside, I thought about the intensifying effect the warming globe is having on the world’s weather; and about the corporations that ignore or deny it, continuing business as usual to the detriment of us all.

The tar sands gigaproject in Northern Alberta is one glaring example. The Indigenous Environmental Network has campaigned to stop the tar sands project for years.  Tar sands oil production poisons Indigenous communities, levels boreal forests, and releases three times the greenhouse gases of conventional oil. But rather than banning this devastating project, a new pipeline is planned, to carry this toxic oil through the US to the Gulf of Mexico.

Hurricane Irene caused billions in damages. Burning tar sands oil will further worsen climate change, causing more extreme weather in the future.

The Indigenous Environmental Network will be holding an Indigenous Day of Action against the tar sands this Friday at the gates of the White House.  To learn more, go to: www.ienearth.org/

For the Earth Minute and the Sojourner Truth show, this is Anne Petermann from Global Justice Ecology Project.

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Filed under Actions / Protest, Climate Change, Climate Justice, Earth Minute, Energy, Posts from Anne Petermann

¡Will Miller Presente! May Day 1971 DC Mobilization: This is What Revolution Will Look Like

By Anne Petermann, Executive Director, Global Justice Ecology Project

As I sat at home in northern Vermont yesterday, with the remnants of Hurricane Irene swirling outside, the rain beating in waves rhythmically on the roof, I thought about climate chaos—the intensifying effect the warming globe is having on the world’s weather; and I thought about the so-called leaders of this and other countries who stick their heads in the sand to ignore it, while corporations continue business as usual and the planet’s life-support systems steadily erode.

In the local paper on Saturday there was a front page article about the mobilization in Washington, DC against the tar sands: the world’s dirtiest source of oil and a major contributor to climate chaos. One barrel of tar sands oil results in three times the emissions of convetional oil.  The oil is mined and extracted using a highly destructive and toxic process that poisons Indigenous communities and flattens boreal forests in the region of Northern Canada where the tar sands are found.  Wildlife in the area is being devastated.  Indigenous Environmental Network and other organizations have been campaigning to raise awareness about this horrific “gigaproject” for years now.  And so far, several hundred people have willingly been arrested in Washington, DC to send politicians a message that they must stop all support for the tar sands project.  IEN is calling for an Indigenous Day of Action this Friday.

Today, August 29th, is the birthday of our good friend and compañero, Will Miller.  He would have been 71.  He passed away in 2005.  He was also one of Global Justice Ecology Project’s founding Board members.  Will’s birthday and the tar sands civil disobedience campaign have made me think of another mass-mobilization in Washington, DC—this one happened 40 years ago on May Day 1971.  It was called to stop another US government-backed horror—the Vietnam War.  That mobilization was designed to shut down Washington, DC.  To stop all business in the city.  To let the politicians in Washington know in no uncertain terms that there would be no more business as usual until the war was ended.

I was not there, but my husband, Orin, was.  As was Will. Though they did not know each other then.  The May Day action plan was for affinity groups—tightly knit groups willing to take direct action together and risk arrest—to take over key locations across DC and shut them down.  In Orin’s case, it was one of DC’s circle intersections.  In the case of Will, it was the 14th street bridge.  This collective  direct action to shut down the city showed the country’s “leaders” that the anti-war movement was escalating its tactics in response to the growing body counts in Vietnam of both U.S. Soldiers and Vietnamese people. An estimated three million Vietnamese people were killed in that war, as were 60,000 U.S. soldiers.  An additional 100,000+ U.S. soldiers who were in Vietnam committed suicide since returning from combat.

Will Miller (far left) at the 1971 May Day action in Washington DC.

The May Day mobilization was widely publicized and the authorities stood at the ready. Will (a veteran) and his affinity group had successfully taken over the 14th street bridge.  The National Guard—a group of young soldiers recently returned from Vietnam—was called in to remove them from the bridge.  The officer in charge ordered the soldiers to fix bayonettes and force the protesters off the bridge.  These young draftees looked at the mix of veterans and activists on the bridge, then back at their commanding officer.  Then they laid down their weapons and joined the protesters in blocking the bridge.

 This, Will said, was what revolution would look like.

 ¡Will Miller, Presente!  

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Filed under Actions / Protest, Climate Change, Indigenous Peoples, Tar Sands, Victory!

BP executives brace for a stormy meeting with shareholders

Note: Check back in with Climate Connections later today to listen to Suzanne Dhaliwal, co-founder of the UK Tar Sands Network, speak on KPFK Radio’s Sojourner Truth program about today’s protests.

–The GJEP Team

_________________

Cross-posted from the Independent

Scores of people plan to protest today at the oil firm’s AGM

The Deepwater Horizon oil rig burning after last year's explosion in the Gulf of Mexico

By Michael McCarthy, Tom Peck and Sarah Morrison

Annual general meetings are sometimes stormy affairs, but the tempest swirling around the London AGM of the oil giant BP this morning looks unprecedented.

At least half a dozen vociferous and angry groups are set to lay siege to the British Petroleum board and its American chief executive, Bob Dudley, when they go through the annual ritual of facing their shareholders at the Excel convention centre in London’s Docklands.

Fishermen and women from the Gulf Coast in the United States who were hit by the oil spill that followed the explosion of BP’s Deepwater Horizon rig will be joined in protests at the meeting by indigenous communities who are angry about the company’s involvement in tar sands extraction in Canada.

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